Strelka Institute is a non-profit organization aimed at generating knowledge, producing new ideas and making them come true. Its lecture halls and studios provide free tuition for international young specialists with backgrounds in architecture, design, social sciences, etc. 

Strelka Institute is a non-profit organization aimed at generating knowledge, producing new ideas and making them come true. Its lecture halls and studios provide free tuition for international young specialists with backgrounds in architecture, design, social sciences, etc.

Alexander Mamut, Sergei Adonyev, Ilya Oskolkov-Tsentsiper, Dmitry Likin and Oleg Shapiro brought the creative idea they had for Strelka Institute to life. It would go on to transform Russia’s physical and social environment, with cities being the platform for that change.

The students at Strelka studied the urban environment and the nature of its transformation in relation to the changed world around us. This collective effort resulted in a unique research, educational and public centre, looking at the complex problems of a Russian city.

110 students, 30 teachers and over 200 international experts took part in developing this radically new intellectual and physical space in Moscow. The theme for Strelka research this upcoming school year is Urban Routines.

The outcomes of research will make up the Urban Routines student publication, as well as a big student exhibition in Russian and English, that will open a month after the launch of the upcoming Venice Biennale of Architecture.

The theme of Urban Routines complements the main theme of the Venice Biennale. That Strelka team is developing a concept for the Russian pavilion which will stay in close contact with the Strelka education programme.

Rem Koolhaas, the curator of the 13th Biennale, proposes reflecting on the processes of adaptation of the modernity to various national cultures, that took place in the course of a whole century (1914-2014). While Strelka education programme will look at the same processes in the context of the present.